Apr
15
2016
Exclusive
For Web

Holistic Child Centered Network

(1 Vote)

Hues for Humanity is a colorful fun family walk or run, that is dedicated to raising funds to support children in Ethiopia to go to school.  It is a great way to bring business, school, and community members together for a day of wholesome family activities. It helps inspires global citizenship, because the proceeds raised benefits children abroad.  All proceeds from Hues For Humanity Runs support Canadian Humanitarian.

Canadian Humanitarian is dedicated to assisting disadvantaged children break free from the cycle of poverty. Our programs help children succeed at school by providing funds for tuition, uniforms, school supplies, afterschool sites that provide a daily meal, tutoring, special interest clubs and emotional support.

We provide shelter, food security, and clothing; medical supplies and regular exams to children and guardian families; we support educational and vocational training centers; we conduct workshops in project communities, and train project staff to continue these workshops.  Most importantly we offer hope to many who have been negatively affected by the realities of poverty.    

We work with the students to develop a love for education, reading, leadership, communication skills, and a commitment to improving their communities at their schools and centers.  We have been providing funds for single mothers, grandmothers and aunts to begin micro-enterprise training, developing effective and reliable ways to support their families, and increase their self-confidence and independence.  Our role is to secure the funds and continuing support necessary to keep our commitments to our project partners, the children and guardians that benefit from them.  The tremendous positive response of the children and families in Ethiopia is what keeps Canadian Humanitarian committed to raise funds, support, and awareness all across North America.    As a grassroots organization we strive to keep our operating expenses to a minimum, and at 15 % or less of overall donation funding.


Dr Richard Northcott travelled to Ethiopia for the first time in 1994. While he fell in love with the Ethiopian people and culture, he was overwhelmed with the extreme conditions of poverty that children and youth accepted as normal life. 

That first trip changed his, and his family’s life.

Dr Northcott founded a Canadian registered Charity, specifically organized to address the needs of children and youth in Africa. He and his wife worked for many years to forge relationships with Ethiopian and Non Ethiopian Charities, and began to do whatever they could to help.

In 2002, the years of informal humanitarian activities in Ethiopia became formally known as “Canadian Humanitarian Organization for International Relief”.   In Canada the organization is commonly referred to as “Canadian Humanitarian” and has been a recognized charity since 2003.  In January 2009 the USA charitable arm of Canadian Humanitarian known as “Kid’s Hope Ethiopia” became a 501-3(c) registered charity.

Canadian Humanitarian has expanded in African, now with registered charity licensing Malawi and Uganda as well.


Henok and Mikias were two young boys who were brought into the After School program in 2005.

Their afterschool program requested a special gymnastics club.  The managers enquired around Addis and found volunteers willing to teach Gymnastics/acrobatics to the students two sessions each week from a professional acrobatics group with origins to Cirque du Soliel.

Henok and Mikias loved being part of this club.  They quickly became agile gymnasts, and began performing for fun at special Canadian Humanitarian celebrations and local community events.   The professional team took notice of them, and by the time they were grade 10, they were working and performing with the professional troup when they had the time.

This past year, both Henok and Mikias were offered a place on the professional international team.

They spent 8 months touring Russia and Eastern Europe with the company.

Not only did the Canadian Humanitarian program help them succeed with their education, but it also gave them a chance to learn gymnastics, and discover a talent that has become their profession.

Henok and Mikias spoke recently at a celebration with younger students, encouraging them to study hard at school, to participate every day at the after school programs, and to not give up on finding their dreams.

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