Nov
21
2012
Volume
-

Essential Skills

(0 votes)

1. READING TEXT

Refers to reading material that is in the form of sentences or paragraphs and generally involves reading notes, letters, memos, manuals, specifications, regulations, books, reports, or journals.

It includes:

  • forms and labels if they contain at least one paragraph.
  • print and non-print media (for example, texts on computer screens and microfiche).
  • paragraph-length text in charts, tables and graphs.

2. DOCUMENT USE

Refers to tasks that involve a variety of information displays in which words, numbers, icons and other visual characteristics (e.g. line, colour, shape) are given meaning by their spatial arrangement. For example, graphs, lists, tables, blueprints, schematics, drawings, signs, and labels are documents used in the world of words.

It includes:

  • print and non-print media (such as computer screen, equipment gauges, clocks and flags).
  • producing of documents. These two uses of documents often occur simultaneously as part of the same task.( e.g., completing a form, checking off items on a list of tasks, plotting information on a graph, and entering information on an activity schedule).

3. WRITING

  • writing texts and writing in documents (for example, filling in forms).
  • non-paper-based writing (for example, typing on a computer).

4. NUMERACY

Refers to the workers' use of numbers and their being required to think in quantitative terms.

Examples include:

  • making bill payments, calculating discounts, budgeting, and measuring quantities.

5. ORAL COMMUNICATION

Pertains primarily to the use of speech to give and exchange thoughts and information by workers in an occupational group (e.g. following or giving instructions, interacting with customers, participating in face to face meetings, and making presentations to a group).

6. THINKING SKILLS

Includes problem solving, decision-making, critical thinking, job task planning and organizing, memory use, and finding information.

7. WORKING WITH OTHERS

Examines the extent to which employees work with others to carry out their tasks (e.g. does the employee work well in a home environment; does the employee work well independently yet still within a group; does the employee work jointly with a partner; does the employee work well as a team?).

8. COMPUTER USE

Examines the variety and complexity of computer use within the occupational group and ranges from simple data entry to highly complex design and set up of new computer networks.

9. CONTINUOUS LEARNING

  • continuous Learning examines the requirement for workers to participate in an ongoing process of acquiring skills and knowledge.
  • it is becoming apparent that more and more jobs require continuous upgrading, and that all workers must continue learning in order to keep or to grow with their jobs.
  • knowing how to learn, understanding one's own learning style and knowing how to gain access to a variety of materials, resources and learning opportunities will become essential skills.
  • examples of Continuous Learning include: training in job-related health and safety; obtaining and updating credentials; and learning about new equipment, procedures, products and services.

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THE OIL SANDS DEVELOPERS GROUP

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